Seed Starting Pots

Easy Guide to Make Seed Pots Out of Household Items

If you need little pots to sprout seeds at home, browsing through house items could be rewarding! Junk paper and unused pots will be easy and environment-friendly choices for gardening purposes.

By planting seeds indoors during the winter, your plants will already be at win when the growing season starts. Regardless of the kind of pot you use, planted seeds will grow just fine if they receive proper warmth, moisture and sunlight. You can purchase commercial containers produced specifically for seed sprouting; but if you prefer to spend less money, go ahead and re-use items lying around in your house. It’s easy to transform residual paper material into little seed pots. Items like newspaper, cardboard boxes, junk paper and paper towel rolls are decomposable and will be perfect choices for you. Follow the instructions on this article, and you’ll learn to make as many seed pots as you want!

Seed-Starting Pots

Newspaper Pots

You can easily make tiny yet beautiful pots out of residual newspaper for the seeds. Any glass or plastic jar will serve well as a mold for your newspaper pots. If you can’t find any jars around the house, it’s a good option to use a straight-sided glass with preferred size.

You Will Need:

  • A small glass jar
  • Newspaper
  • Scissors
  • Shallow pan of water
  • Seed starter potting mix
  • Seeds

Step 1: Cut Newspaper

Cut the newspaper into rectangular strips. They should be large enough to wrap around the whole jar and have some overlapping.

Step 2: Soak Newspaper

Fill a shallow pan with water and submerge the newspaper strips inside until they’re soaked.

Step 3: Shape Pots

Roll the moistened strips around the jar. Keep the bottom edge of strips over the jar so you can fold it and shape the pot’s bottom. Crease the top edge of paper around the jar. Press the pot’s bottom against a flat surface until it’s smooth. Set the pots to dry. After the paper has dried, gently slide the pot off the jar.

Step 4: Plant Seeds

Fill the newspaper pots with seed starter mix and gently tap the soil down. Make a shallow hole in the center of the pot. Put the seed inside the hole and cover it with soil. Use a spray to water the pots. Make sure the soil is moistened all the way through.

Recycled Box Seed Pots

Many items come inside paper or cardboard cartons. You can plant the seeds in boxes with proper size. Paper boxes are usually durable and will last until the seedlings can be planted outside. Boxes with divider pieces inside are perfect as seed trays; you can plant several seeds in the same box this way.

You Will Need:

  • Paper box (such as a tea box)
  • Scissors
  • Seed starter potting mix
  • Seeds

Step 1: Cut Boxes

Cut one of the longer sides off the box to create a shallow tray.

Step 2: Make Dividers

If required, use the cut-off piece as a divider.

Step 3: Plant Seeds

Fill the box with seed starter mix and gently tap the soil down to smooth the surface. Make a shallow hole in each section and put a seed in each hole. Spray some water on the soil until it’s properly moistened.

Paper Towel Tube Pots

Paper towels are highly useful, and so are their tubes! You can use the leftover paper tube for many DIY crafts, including homemade seed pots.

You Will Need:

  • Paper towel tube
  • Scissors
  • Seed starter potting mix
  • Seeds

Step 1: Cut Tube

Cut the tube into three-inch flaps. Next, make a ¾ inch long cut at one edge of each section. The shorter cuts will secure the flaps in place.

Step 2: Fold Flaps

Fold each flap and attach it onto the cut on the next section to form the bottom. Small gaps left between the flaps will act as a drain hole.

Step 3: Plant Seeds

Fill the paper tube pots with seed starter mix and gently tap the soil down. Make a shallow hole in the center of the pot. Put the seed inside the hole and cover it with soil. Use a spray to water the pots. Make sure the soil is moistened all the way through.

Papier-Mâché Pots

Seed-Starting Pots

You can make tougher pots by exposing the paper material to some heat. This method is similar to other paper crafts, but it has extra steps where you add in some flour, shape the paper mixture into a pot, then bake it.

You Will Need:

  • Shredded newspaper, junk paper or cardboard
  • Blender
  • Water
  • Mesh strainer
  • Large bowl
  • Small sponge
  • Flour
  • Muffin pan
  • Oven
  • Seed starter potting mix
  • Seeds

Step 1: Blend Paper Shreds

Put the shredded paper inside your blender and add water until paper pieces are covered. Let the paper soak and soften for some minutes before blending. Then, you want to blend them until the mixture is smooth. Pre-heat the oven to 200˚c.

Step 2: Strain Paper Mixture

Place the mesh strainer over a large bowl and transfer the paper mixture into the strainer. Press the paper with a sponge until the water is drained and you get a clay-like consistency.

Step 3: Shape Pots

Pour the paper mixture in a bowl and add 2 tsp of plain flour. Mix the flour and paper until it’s uniform. Make small balls of the mixture and press them into the muffin pan until the walls of each cup are covered. It’s better to get the layers as thin as possible. Use all of the mixture and make as many pots as possible.

Step 4: Bake Pots

Put the pan inside pre-heated oven and bake the pots for an hour. Keep in mind that pots will not be totally dry when you take them out of the oven; you will need to give your paper pots extra time to completely dry before usage. Let the pots cool down and carefully remove them from the pan. Place the pots on a cooling rack and leave them to dry overnight.

Step 5: Plant Seeds

Fill the paper pots with seed starter mix and gently tap the soil down. Make a shallow hole in the center of the pot. Put the seed inside the hole and cover it with soil. Use a spray to water the pots. Make sure the soil is moistened all the way through.

It’s better to check the seed pack label for proper planting time. Most seeds should be planted six to eight weeks prior to the average late frost date. Hence, if it’s about 15 April in your area, you might want to plant the seeds after March 18. After the seedlings appear, allow them to receive enough sunlight or install artificial lights. You can begin transferring the seedlings outside if the weather is warm enough. Sprouts should be habituated to outdoor conditions before you plant them outside. This means you should put the pots in the open air for about an hour or two during the day, and gradually increase the time until your seedlings are adapted. Then it’ll be time to plant them into the garden or larger pots on your porch.

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